FOMO – Killer of Effective Marketing Communication

No matter how awesome your stuff is, it does you no good if you can’t communicate to the relevant people about it.

When you get down to the purpose of communication, it’s to GET YOUR POINT THROUGH.

Which means, if you get too convoluted in your communication you’re going to lose your audience’s attention. When your audience gets lost, you don’t get your point through and they don’t understand you have good stuff for them. You don’t get to sell your stuff, and that’s not good for business.

I see a lot of “verbal diarrhea” in most marketing communications – online and offline.

I’m guilty too. I was looking at my website homepage the other day, and I thought – what exactly do I want to communicate? If I were a first-time visitor, would I know what to do?

When I redesigned the homepage, it started out with a pretty clear objective. As time went by, I read an article here and listened to a webinar there, I thought – hey maybe I should tell people A and B, and I probably should put a link for Y and Z.

So I added A and B and Y and Z – and the homepage got mucky.

It’s not because I didn’t know Keep It Simple Sunshine is a usually a good thing – I challenge my clients to do that all the time.

It’s because I am human, and I have FOMO (fear of missing out).

Many times when I come across a “tip” or “tactic” I have the urge to add it to my marketing communication so I can tell myself I got all the ground covered and I am pulling all the strings.

Not for the sake of my audience. But for the selfish reason of pacifying my FOMO…

Forgetting that if I pull all the strings and they go in opposite directions, they would cancel out the effect of each other!

3 Simple Words for FOMO Prevention: Clarity + Discernment + Discipline

FOMO can creep up everywhere in our communications – from website to brochures to presentations.

You need a powerful filter so you can stay focused and get the point through.

1. Clarity – what do you want this piece of communication to achieve? What’s the best way to get the point through?

2. Discernment – simple, chuck whatever that don’t answer the questions above.

3. Discipline – it’s easier said than done when it comes to “chucking” stuff. Now you have the awareness, you need to train your Discipline muscle so you can execute your discernment and free your communications from FOMO.

Theory is cheap… here’s how to stay focused when you write for these common webpages:

HOMEPAGE

What’s the primary objective to support your business at the moment? Building your list? Creating an authority positioning? Showcasing your work? Launching your book? Promoting a webinar?

What’s the secondary objective?

What’s the MINIMUM amount of content, links or calls-to-action needed to support your primarily and secondary objectives?

When you put too many choices on the page, your visitors will be confused. And the confused mind says “no”.

Is your Call-To-Action that supports your primary objective loud and clear? Or has it disappeared into a sea of content? If everything is screaming, nothing can be heard.

ABOUT PAGE

Your about page is not really about you. Your readers don’t care about your entire life story unless it is relevant to why and how you can help them.

Typically, your about page needs to (1) build a personal and emotional bridge so your readers can connect with YOU and trust you; and (2) share your experience to illustrate why you are qualified to help them and how you can do so.

Your about page needs to answer the question – why are YOU, as a PERSON, relevant to helping ME solve my problem?

Just listing out your trainings and certifications is not enough – what’s your journey? What’s your unique point of view that would make me want to work with you rather than the next gal?

BLOG POSTS

Your blog on your business website is not your personal journal. Write your articles with an objective in mind.

One big idea per article, one call-to-action per article.

What do you want the article to achieve for your business? What call-to-action will help you achieve this result?

Who are you writing for, and what do they need to know to take the intended action?

If you have the tendency to ramble, have the discipline to read and re-read your articles, and DELETE anything not essential to getting the point through. (note: read and re-read, but don’t get stuck in perfectionism. You need to hit that “publish” button.)

Run-on sentences? Break them down into 2-3 smaller chunks. Big jargon-y words? Find a plain English alternative.

Run your content through a readability score tool – a 7th grader should be able to comprehend your article.

Stop FOMO from driving your marketing communications:

Clarity – know your message, how it applies to your audience, and how to position it to get the point through

Awareness – catch yourself when you are having a verbal diarrhea, and admit it

Discernment – realize what is not in alignment, what is extraneous to getting the point through

Discipline – have the guts to not yield to FOMO and cut out what doesn’t serve the purpose of the communication

The Art & Science of Marketing Communications

There’s a good chance that you’ve come across the term “marketing communications”, if you work in a reasonably large organization. In our present day and age, most organizations have a division that deals with marketing communications. It is often referred to as corporate communications and product marketing.

Marketing communications is the art and science of communicating information that enables a company to market its products or services better. I know that this definition sounds really simple, but it rarely simple in reality. This is because it conceals more than it reveals. It also makes the role appear to be simple and straightforward. However, in today’s world marketing communications is one of the most complex fields of business.

It is not difficult to fathom the reason for this term’s complexity because it only works in an evolved marketplace. Its complexity depends on how advanced or developed the marketplace itself is. The last promotional e-mail that you got in your inbox is a good example. Promotional emails usually come embedded with action scripts, flash, cookies and a whole lot of other high technology wizardry. This method is the best practices in marketing communications at work.

Your usage patterns are being monitored so that businesses can determine whether you will click on the links in the e-mail. They can further track your activities when you reach the landing page if you click on the links. How long you stay online, which pages you visit, what lengths of time you spend on those pages and which products you are specifically interested in, are patterns that will also be monitored. This information will then be sent back to the centralized server. Adept marketing communications professionals will use the data to structure their next communication to you.

All communication in the present world has moved towards being measurable and marketing communications is no exception. It is proving to be an invaluable tool for the modern day marketer because it is being measurable, traceable and result oriented.

Marketing Communications

Marketing communications is referred to as the messages and the media used to relate those messages to the market. There are many ways in which you can communicate with the market namely through personal selling, sales promotion, public relations, publicity, advertising, direct marketing and so on. In this article, we shall look at a few of these methods.

Personal selling

Personal selling is referred to as a means of selling the product to the consumer personally. It was much easier to sell products in the last century than it is now. The basic philosophy of the seller is to sell products not as a peddler but as a consultant. For this, personal selling has become a viable tool as companies manipulate the emotion of the consumer to make them buy products.

Sales Promotion

This is a way in which the sale of a product can be increased. In this type of marketing communication, both the media as well as the non media are involved. Their goal is to increase the demand of the consumers, increase the number of products or stimulate the demand of the market within a limited predetermined amount of time. Some examples of sales promotion can be contest, rebate, free flights and even “point of purchase” displays.

Public Relations

This involves the managing of relations between a company and its customers. Public relations involve activities on the part of the company that do not directly lead to payment from its customers or the public. Some examples of public relations include press conferences, speaking in public meetings and communication with the employees.

The difference between Public Relations and Advertising is that while advertising has some tangible output, public relations is non tangible.

Publicity

It is a means of promotion. It is through this means of marketing communication that companies attempt to manipulate the perception the public has of a particular brand. Publicity is generally done through some celebrity like a film star or politician. Services and goods and even works of entertainment and art and different organisations are also used for the purpose of publicity.

Advertising

This is a form of marketing communication that involves two things. Firstly it includes the name of the service or the product and secondly, it narrates the benefit the product will give to the consumer. The main goal of advertising is to persuade a person to buy a product. Mass production has had a very important role behind the development of advertising. Advertising came to rise in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Direct Marketing

This is a relatively new type of marketing which involves looking for people within the target, and then communicating to them the details of the product.

There are two things that differentiate it from other types of marketing. The first thing is that it attempt to sell products directly to consumers. It does not use forms of media as an intervention to reach to its consumers. The second thing is that it rests on a “call to action” mechanism. This means that it stresses on the positive responses from the consumer, whatever be the medium.